Onions & Apple Trees

We are finally getting some rain!

I was beginning to lose hope we would get any moisture at all. Last night as I sat out by my fire I watched the clouds filled with rain go around me. It seemed to be raining everywhere but here. It didn’t even smell like rain, which was disheartening in itself.

This morning started out warm and sunny, so I thought for sure the forecast was out to lunch. I took the big dog for a walk across the field because we both needed to get out for a little while. It was warm and sunny while we were out, but started to cloud over shortly after we got back. I still didn’t have any faith we were going to get rain.

I was honestly surprised when the heavier clouds rolled in and the rain began. Our fields are so dry. This will help the fields, pastures, and the gardens. It’ll delay some seeding for a few days, but it will be worth it in the end.

Spring Cleanup

Yesterday afternoon I cleaned out one of the raised beds I didn’t get to before the snow fell, and was surprised to find onion bulbs as firm as they had been during the summer. I planted about 12 little multiplier bulbs last spring, and used the green onion all summer. I even pulled a few and used them.

As I was cleaning the bed, I started uprooting the bulbs…and to my surprise I ended up with 30 of them. As excited as I was, my thought then was “What am I supposed to do with them?”. I’ll be moving in a couple months, so I couldn’t very well just leave them there to grow; especially since I’m disassembling the raised bed so I can take it with me.

Multiplier Onions

The next thing I cleaned out was the self-watering planter I made last summer. It had been filled with herbs, and it worked wonderfully for them. All that’s left in it is the clump of chives, which I decided not to uproot. I decided the onion bulbs could go in with the chives, at least until I figure out where else to put them.

I raked up piles of woodchips and grass, with the hopes of having a bit of a bonfire in the evening. The wind picked up and that was not to be; at least not where my main fire pit is. (I did have a small one in my little screened firebox on the other side of the house though.) Now those said piles are getting a good soaking in the rain, so they won’t burn very well. They may just become mulch in my new yard instead.

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Relocating Trees

I’ve had quite a bit of experience over the years with houseplants, herbs, vegetables, and even soft fruits. My challenge this year, however, is going to be relocating my apple trees. I have to admit, I’m a little worried.

My kids bought them for me two years ago for my birthday, and I planted them: one on the north side of my house, and one on the south. At that point in time I hadn’t even considered moving; I was too distraught with Ross’s passing.

Now here I am, two years later; and trying to figure out the best way to move them so I don’t lose them. Like I said, my experience with moving trees is minimal. I do suppose this will be a learning experience for me.

From what I can tell from my research, the best time to dig them up is before they bud out. I was going to do that this afternoon, but the rain came before I could start. And to be honest, I really have no desire to dig up trees in the pouring rain.

Since my move won’t be until early July, my best option will be to put them in a container. Since the trunks are just a little bigger than an inch, the root ball will have to be no smaller than 18″. My research also tells me if they are in a container, they can be transplanted at any time. (Bare root trees would have to be done when the roots are dormant.)

Something else I learned is the trees should be marked so they face the same direction when planted in their new spot. In all honesty, it’s not something I would have even considered if I had just been “winging it”. It pays to do your research; whether you’re writing an essay or moving trees.

Giving the trees a good soaking before digging them up is essential, so I think Mother Nature has to be thanked for that. Keeping the container watered to avoid stress to the roots is also beneficial. Giving them plenty of room to spread out even while in the container will help lessen the shock when they’re put in the ground again. At least that’s my thought; and hope.

Once they’re placed in the new spot, they’ll have to be staked and watered regularly. Right now both trees are around the 8′ tall mark (give or take) so should be relatively easy to transport in an enclosed trailer. I really don’t want to risk them getting damaged by the wind in the back of the truck, especially since over half of the trip will be at highway speed.

All I can hope for is my trees survive the move. Have you moved trees before?

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Author: Diane Ziomek

I am a mom, independent author, freelance writer, fibre artist, and podcaster. I like to share what I have learned with others over the years, in hopes of making their lives easier and more lucrative. My published works can be found on most ebook platforms, as well as on my website. I also have a just-for-fun website about gardening where I share information about plants, how-to's, and gardening in a cold climate.

2 thoughts on “Onions & Apple Trees”

  1. WOW…What a wonderful read…a suggestion for your apple trees…do you have access to a couple of burlap gunny sacks that you can place them in??? Started some cucumber, pumpkin, zuchinni and some are ready to be transplanted already so thinking about sticking them in a couple of self-watering containers in the greenhouse, even though all my plastic is ripped to shreds from the winter wind…I am thinking of getting some heavy foam underlay to use as covering…the filtered light should still work I think…and I will throw the tarp roof back during the day…that really helped after I had chatted to you about lack of growth without the direct sunlight from overhead…Anyway please be safe and well…thanks and take care…CIAO…

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    1. I’d like to put them in pots since it’s going to be a couple months before I can plant them in their new home. I had considered burlap, but after some additional research decided pots would be better in this case.
      I’m glad you were able to get some good growth after all. It’s amazing how much light the tarps do block; especially the rays that the plants need.
      Thanks for your comment and suggestion. 🙂

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